Ancient mummies of Egypt’s royal pharaohs are set to emerge from their resting places on April 3 and parade through the streets of Cairo.

The lavish, multimillion-dollar spectacle saw 22 mummies – 18 kings and four queens – transported from the peach-coloured, neoclassical Egyptian Museum to their new resting place 5km (three miles) away.mummies will be relocated in chronological order of their reigns i.e., from 17th Dynasty ruler, Seqenenre Taa II, to Ramses IX, who reigned in the 12th Century BC.

Ancient mummies of Egypt’s royal pharaohs are set to emerge from their resting places on April 3 and parade through the streets of Cairo, moving from the historic Museum of Egyptian Antiquities to their new home in the recently inaugurated National Museum of Egyptian Civilization. A

As per reports, each mummy will be placed in a special capsule filled with nitrogen to ensure protection and the capsules will be carried on carts designed to cradle them and provide stability. They will be carried on a decorated vehicle fitted with special shock-absorbers and surrounded by a motorcade, including replica horse-drawn war chariots

Social media users have questioned whether the myth of “the curse of the pharaohs” might be to blame.

The ethics of displaying ancient Egyptian mummies has long been debated. Many Muslim scholars believe that the dead should be treated with dignity and respect and not be exhibited as curiosities.

In 1980, President Anwar Sadat ordered the Royal Mummy Room at the Egyptian Museum closed, arguing that it desecrated the dead. He wanted the mummies to be reburied instead, though he did not get his wish.

Now, the Egyptian authorities are hoping that the new museum, which opens fully this month, will help revitalise tourism. The industry has been battered by political turbulence over the past decade, and more recently by the COVID-19 pandemic. Saturday’s event will also be streamed online for all enthusiasts of ancient Egypt to watch.

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